THYMES

Tupelo Lemongrass Home Fragrance Mist 3 oz

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$ 18.99
  • Tupelo Lemongrass Home Fragrance Mist 3 oz

THYMES

Tupelo Lemongrass Home Fragrance Mist 3 oz

Loading reviews...
$ 18.99

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  • Citrus and floral notes burst forth with each spritz of this Tupelo Lemongrass Home Fragrance Mist. Sunny citrus and lively floral fragrance notes give your space a vibrant energy. Gentle breezes sweep through wild Privet leaves and lily of the valley, creating a secret, sun-dappled place in your home. Discover the vibrant, citrus fragrance of Tupelo Lemongrass by Thymes, a patchwork of vitality and light. Sparkling clementine: whether discovered by a monk in an orphanage in Algeria, or native to China long before, clementine beguiles. A variety of mandarin orange, aka a seedless tangerine, the easily peeled fruit is strikingly sweet and has a delicate citrus aroma. Sunny neroli: said to have been first captured by a princess of Nerola, in Italy, oil of neroli is distilled from the freshly picked flowers of the bitter orange tree. It has an emphatically refreshing, spicy, floral fragrance. Golden Tupelo honey: a sweet syrup made by bees from floral nectar. Its aroma reflects the pollen source, which can range from clover to almond trees. Rich in many essential nutrients including vitamins C, D and E, honey is also a natural humectant that draws moisture to the skin. Balmy lily of the valley: also known as muguet, lily of the valley blooms in spring in dense thickets across the forest floor. Its bell-shaped white flowers emit an intense, elegant fragrance that blends floral with hints of greenness and fresh lemon. Tonic Privet leaves: earthy and green in fragrance, this plant grows throughout Asia and extends into Australia. The commonly used hedge plant is popular in horticulture and flower arrangements. Enveloping tonka bean: renowned for its fragrance, Tonka bean evokes cargo shipped along the Spice Islands: vanilla, almond, cinnamon and cloves. Discovered in South America, it was once used to flavor pipe tobacco.